A rather sad Space Precinct legacy for Thunderbirds producer Gerry Anderson

Gerry Anderson in his Pinewood office in 1979

Gerry Anderson in Pinewood office, 1979

In the film industry, there is a long tradition of chisellers, cheats, conmen and crooks. Put this together with lower TV budgets, a morally decent producer and a British TV production company trying to create an expensive-for-TV, glossy sci-fi series made for both the US and UK markets (which have differing expectations) and shot at a major British film studio and you have a recipe both for major production problems and an almost certainly tragic sitcom.

In 1979, I chatted to TV producer Gerry Anderson at Pinewood Studios during one of several low points in his life.

I reprinted parts of the interview in three blogs back in January last year

Seven years after I had that chat with him, in 1986, Gerry Anderson produced a 55-minute TV pilot film entitled Space Police.

Shane Rimmer (right) in Space Police pilot

Shane Rimmer (right) in original Space Police pilot

The pilot featured Anderson regular Shane Rimmer as a New York cop called Brogan. The series failed to sell and the pilot was never aired.

Fast forward another eight years and, in 1994, Gerry got together with Mentorn TV boss Tom Gutteridge. They re-styled the Space Police concept and made an ill-fated series called Space Precinct with Ted Shackelford as Brogan.

The new Space Precinct documentary

The Space Precinct Legacy documentary

Last night, at the Prince Charles Cinema in London, I attended what was rather grandly called the ‘world premiere’ screening of Space Precinct Legacy, a 90-minute documentary on the troubled making of the Space Precinct series.

Space Precinct was conceived as a cop series set in space, where “instead of the usual run-of-the-mill baddies, you’ve got aliens as baddies”. It centred on the adventures of New York cop Brogan, transferred to take care of trouble on a distant planet filled with cops and baddies wearing prosthetic heads. Animatronics inside the heads made the eyes move.

Expectations were high but were slowly dashed as the production progressed.

Last night, the documentary’s director Paul Cotrulia explained: “We tried to keep it as honest a telling of the making of Space Precinct as we could without getting sued.”

During the production of the Space Precinct series, there were problems with the US distributor who had claimed to have pre-sold the series across the nation in peaktime slots (a necessity to actually finance the series). In fact, in the US, the series tended to be scheduled in early morning kids slots or very late night graveyard slots with far lower advertising returns.

At one point, Tom Gutteridge had to borrow £2 million to continue shooting the series himself when money from the US backers stopped and twelve US lawyers flew over to the UK to try to get out of the watertight contract signed by the backers.

The backers backed down and continued to finance the show, though presumably through gritted teeth.

US and UK dramatic needs varied

The US and UK markets required incompatible drama types

There was a fundamental problem because of the differing tastes and expectations of US and UK audiences. The  Americans wanted darker adult drama for peaktime screening. The British wanted twinkle-in-the-eye knowing humour.

Executive producer Tom Gutteridge says:

“If there had been a second series, we would have had to have decided precisely what the show was that we were making. If we were making an American show just for America – which is really what we should have done – it would have been a completely different animal and I’m not absolutely convinced that Gerry Anderson would have been the hands-on producer.

“I think it would have been creatively very different. We would have had a much clearer, stronger, probably darker vision. The humour would have been more consistent all the way through, there would have been fewer – better – writers. There would have been a single voice and that voice I don’t think would have been Gerry Anderson’s… if there had been a second series.”

The Space Precinct title logo

The Space Precinct on-screen title logo

In retrospect, he thinks there was not enough money, certainly not enough time and that more money should have been put into special effects and less into “lining some people’s pockets”.

Other people involved in the production agree that the series was, partly, scuppered by “jobs for the boys” and dodgy geezers.

One seemingly generally-held opinion was that: “Gerry was listening to all the wrong people – his friends or his trusted allies – and that was a mistake… There were just a handful of people there who were taking the money and running – lining their pockets as fast as possible.”

Jamie Anderson, Gerry’s son, said after the screening last night:

Christine Glanville (left) and Mary Turner on Gerry Anderson’s series Four Feather Falls

Christine Glanville (left) and Mary Turner working on an early Gerry Anderson puppet series Four Feather Falls

“I was ten years old. I just had an amazing time, but I remember being sat awkwardly trying to ignore a conversation in which Christine Glanville who had worked from the very beginning as a puppeteer – right from the start – and had been with dad all the way through his various shows… She said she felt really let down by some members of the crew.

“Up until that point, in every show they’d worked on, there had been a real close-knit family feel and all-of-a-sudden there were a few people there who did seem to be lining their pockets and were just happy to do sub-standard work. Even as a ten year old I could pick that up.”

Even now, there might seem to be a bit of a curse on anything to do with the Space Precinct series.

Director Paul Cotrulia at the premiere last night

Director Paul Cotrulia at premiere last night

Last night, the documentary’s director Paul Cotrulia told me: “My production company and my business partners were very keen to do a Space Precinct re-boot and we explored that idea for some time with Mentorn – developing script outlines – then, halfway through the documentary and developing the (new) show, Mentorn said Oh, actually, by the way, we only own the UK rights to Space Precinct. So you’re not going to be able to sell this project internationally. So it came to a halt.”

There are no clips from the Space Precinct series in the documentary.

Paul Cotrulia explained to me: “About halfway through production (of the documentary), Mentorn told us they didn’t get buy-out contracts from the actors, which meant that we would have had to pay those actors their original fee again just to use a clip. It would have cost too much. The same with the music. I love the music, but EMI wanted an enormous amount of money and we had to be realistic about our projections of how the documentary would perform with just releasing it in the UK.”

A sad legacy for the late Gerry Anderson.

4 Comments

Filed under Movies, Science fiction, Television

4 responses to “A rather sad Space Precinct legacy for Thunderbirds producer Gerry Anderson

  1. How interesting. I played Officer Orrin in the series. It was, as my first job out of drama school, a formative experience for me but of course I was aware of the production troubles at the time. Seems I was lucky to be paid each week! Shame that even the documentary had problems of its own.

  2. A very interesting review, many thanks. I remember the hype for Space Precinct evaporating as soon as the reality of it hit TV screens. Yet another post-Sylvia failing to take flight. I’m working my way through the Anderverse right now and this has given me some ideas on what to say about Space Precinct.

  3. SPACE PRECINCT, in my opinion, had the BEST writing of any Gerry Anderson series since FIREBALL XL5. At the time it aired, I thought it was better-written, and had better, more likable characters, than all the STAR TREK sequels combined. It’s probaby the only TV series I can honestly say that I love every frame of every episode. Gerry Anderson deserved to be prouyd of what he created. I wish I’d written him to say so whhen I still had the chance.

    Someone online recently said they felt STAR COPS had more interesting stories and better special effects. I saw a few episodes of that, and found it dull beyond belief and bordering on unwatchable. After giving it some thought, I came up with a perfect comic-book comparison. STAR COPS is the kind of show Denny O’Neil would have done. SPACE PRECINCT is the kind of show JACK KIRBY would have done! Kirby was possibly the single best writer the comics biz ever saw. Yet thanks to con-men & corporate thievery, his work is often ignored and dismissed.

    Simply… I KNOW what I like!

  4. David

    Sorry to reply so long after but I just finally got to watch the whole series on streaming, finishing last night. I used to try to watch this when it was “on” but it came on in the middle of the night and then I never heard about it again. I actually thought I imagined it until I was able to look it up online many years later, I didn’t have internet in the 90s.

    Even now, in 2018, I thoroughly enjoyed the show. I don’t mind computer effects but I really appreciate practical effects when I see them, being rare now. I thought the costuming, sets, and especially the Tarns and Creons were very well done. The ships had a slightly “toyish” quality to them but I found them very good and fit well in the story they were in, such as when Brogan crashed his Police Cruiser into a café. The acting and writing were also very good. This show was a hidden gem that got missed by so many, even people that would want to find it. Thank you.

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